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California Department of Education Content Standards

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This has made my teaching sooooo much easier.
– Kim Moreno, Teacher,
Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools


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CDEstandards2

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CCMM supports, reinforces, and enhances student learning and classroom instruction by including objects and materials that instructors can use to supplement their lessons in alignment with the California Department of Education Content Standards. In middle school, students learn about ancient civilizations in the sixth grade, world geography in the seventh grade, and United States history in the eighth grade. School districts use these Content Standards to develop classroom curriculum and instruction materials for each grade level.

Each thematic presentation supports the curriculum for all three grade levels. In the Everyday Connections exhibition, sixth grade students see concrete examples of how geography and climate dictate clothing and housing styles. Seventh graders see the elaborate samurai armor of feudal Japan. Eighth grade students appreciate the evolution of the English game of cricket into the American pastime of baseball during the civil war.

The Commercial Connections presentation allows sixth-graders to hold a silk-worm cocoon, the foundation of the Silk Road. Seventh-graders grind the pepper, nutmeg, and cinnamon spices that prompted the Age of Exploration. Eighth-graders admire the beaver pelt that motivated trappers to explore the “West.”

While visiting the Spiritual Connections presentations, sixth graders recognize ancient Egyptian Canopic jars, while seventh graders are more intrigued by the Muslim Asan (call-to-prayer) clock. Eighth graders see the Constitution’s First Amendment’s guarantee of the free practice of religion in living color.

By featuring tangible artifacts that students recognize from their textbooks and lessons, CCMM ensures that students are engaged with material that is relevant in and out of their classrooms. Students have the opportunity to handle three-dimensional objects that they otherwise would see only in books, if even there. Students themselves recognize the benefits to this interaction and are more inspired to learn.

“Thank you for bringing artifacts from all around the world. It really helped us to get hands-on material. All these wonderful artifacts really did play a big part in our learning history. Instead of reading it in a textbook and seeing pictures we really got to see it in real life.” – Summar N., student, Orville Wright Middle School

Learn how teachers can utilize their students’ CCMM experience to connect their classroom learning to the corresponding California Department of Education Content Standards for each CCMM collection:

  • 6th Grade: History/Social Science

    World History and Geography: Ancient Civilizations

    6.4 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of Ancient Greece.
    • 1. Discuss the connections between geography and the development of city-states in the region of the Aegean Sea, including patterns of trade and commerce among Greek city-states and within the wider Mediterranean region.
    6.5 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of India.
    • 7. Discuss important aesthetic and intellectual traditions (e.g., Sanskrit literature, including the Bhagavad Gita: medicine: metallurgy: and mathematics, including Hindu-Arabic numerals and the zero).
    6.6 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of China.
    • 7. Cite the significance of the trans-Eurasian “silk roads” in the period of the Han Dynasty and Roman Empire and their locations.
    6.7 Students analyze the geographic, political economic, religious, and social structures during the development of Rome.
    • 3. Identify the location of and the political and geographic reasons for the growth of the Roman territories and expansion of the empire, including how the empire fostered economic growth through the use of currency and trade routes.

    7th Grade: History/Social Science

    World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times

    7.2 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Islam in the Middle Ages.
    • 4. Discuss the expansion of Muslim rule through military conquests and treaties, emphasizing the cultural blending within Muslim civilization and the spread and acceptance of Islam and the Arabic language.
    • 5. Describe the growth of cities and the establishment of trade routes among Asia, Africa, and Europe, the products and inventions that traveled along these routes (e.g., spices, textiles, paper, steel, new crops) and the role of merchants in Arab society.
    • 6. Understand the intellectual exchanges among Muslim scholars of Eurasia and Africa and the contributions of Muslim scholars made to later civilizations in the areas of science, geography, mathematics, philosophy, medicine, art, and literature.
    7.3 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of China in the Middle Ages.
    • 5. Trace the historic influence of such discoveries as tea, the manufacture of paper, woodblock printing, the compass, and gunpowder.
    7.4 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the sub-Saharan civilizations of Ghana and Mali in Medieval Africa.
    • 1. Study Niger River and the relationship of vegetation zones of forest, savannah, and the desert to trade in gold, salt, food, and slaves, and the growth of the Ghana and Mali empires.
    • 3. Describe the role of the trans-Saharan caravan trade in the changing religious and cultural characteristics of West Africa and the influence of Islamic beliefs, ethics, and law.
    • 4. Trace the growth of the Arabic language in government, trade, and Islamic scholarship in West Africa.
    • 5. Describe the importance of written and oral traditions in the transmission of African history and culture.
    7.5 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Medieval Japan.
    • 1. Describe the significance of Japan’s proximity to China and Korea and the intellectual, linguistic, religious, and philosophical influence of those countries on Japan.
    7.6 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Medieval Europe.
    • 6. Discuss the causes and course of the religious Crusades and their effects on the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish populations in Europe, with emphasis on the increasing contact by Europeans with cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean world.
    • 9. Know the history of the decline of Muslim rule in the Iberian Peninsula that culminated in the Reconquista and the rise of Spanish and Portuguese kingdoms.
    7.7 Students compare and contrast the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the Meso-American and Andean civilizations.
    • 3. Explain how and where each empire arose and how the Aztec and Incan empires were defeated by the Spanish.
    7.8 Students analyze the origins, accomplishments, and geographic diffusion of the Renaissance.
    • 3. Understand the effects of the reopening of the ancient “Silk Road” between Europe and China, including Marco Polo’s travels and the location of his routes.
    • 4. Describe the growth and effects of new ways of disseminating information (e.g., the ability to manufacture paper, translation of the Bible into vernacular, printing).
    7.9 Students analyze the historical developments of the Reformation.
    • 4. Identify and locate the European regions that remained Catholic and those that became Protestant and explain how the division affected the distribution of religions in the New World.
    7.11 Students analyze political and economic change in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries (the Age of Exploration, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Reason).
    • 1. Know the great voyages of discovery, the locations of the routes, and the influence of cartography in the development of a new European worldview.
    • 2. Discuss the exchanges of plants, animals, technology, culture, and ideas among Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and the major economic and social effects on each continent.
    • 3. Examine the origins of modern capitalism: the influence of mercantilism and cottage industry: the elements and importance of a market economy in seventeenth-century Europe: the changing international trading and marketing patterns, including their locations on a world map: and the influence of explorers and map makers.

    8th Grade: History/Social Science

    United States History and Geography: Growth and Conflict

    8.3 Students understand the foundation of the American political system and the ways in which citizens participate in it.
    • 3. Enumerate the advantages of a common market among the states as foreseen in and protected by the Constitution’s clauses on interstate commerce, common coinage, and full-faith and credit.
    8.4 Students analyze the aspirations and ideals of the people of the new nation.
    • 1. Describe the country’s physical landscapes, political divisions, and territorial expansion during the terms of the first four presidents.
    • 4. Discuss daily life, including traditions in art, music, and literature, of early national America (e.g., through writings by Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper).
    8.5 Students analyze U.S. foreign policy in the early Republic.
    • 2. Know the changing boundaries of the United States and describe the relationships the country had with its neighbors (current Mexico and Canada) and Europe, including the influence of the Monroe Doctrine, and how those relationships influenced westward expansion and the Mexican-American War.
    8.6 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced, with emphasis on the Northeast.
    • 3. List the reasons for the wave of immigration from Northern Europe to the United States and describe the growth in the number, size, and spatial arrangements of cities (e.g., Irish immigrants and the Great Irish Famine).
    • 5. Trace the development of the American education system from its earliest roots, including the roles of religious and private schools and Horace Mann’s campaign for free public education and its assimilating role in American culture.
    8.7 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the South from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.
    • 1. Describe the development of the agrarian economy in the South, identify the locations of the cotton-producing states, and discuss the significance of cotton and the cotton gin.
    8.8 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the West from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.
    • 2. Describe the purposes, challenges, and economic incentives associated with westward expansion, including the concept of Manifest Destiny (e.g., the Lewis and Clark expedition, accounts of the removal of Indians, the Cherokees’ “Trail of Tears,” settlement of the Great Plains) and the territorial acquisitions that spanned numerous decades.
    8.12 Students analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in the United States in response to the Industrial Revolution.
    • 1. Trace patterns of agricultural and industrial development as they relate to climate, use of natural resources, markets, and trade and locate such development on a map.
    • 2. Identify the reasons for the development of federal Indian policy and the wars with American Indians and their relationship to agricultural development and industrialization.
    • 5. Examine the location and effects of urbanization, renewed immigration, and industrialization (e.g., the effects on social fabric of cities, wealth and economic opportunity, the conservation movement).
    • 7. Identify the new sources of large-scale immigration and the contributions of immigrants to the building of cities and the economy: explain the ways in which new social and economic patterns encourage assimilation of newcomers into the mainstream amidst growing cultural diversity: and discuss the new wave of nativism.

    From http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/
    Click to download as a PDF.

  • 6th Grade: History/Social Science

    World History and Geography: Ancient Civilizations

    6.2 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, and Kush.
    • 3. Understand the relationship between religion and the social and political order in Mesopotamia and Egypt.
    6.3 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the Ancient Hebrews.
    • 1. Describe the origins and significance of Judaism as the first monotheistic religion based on the concept of one God who sets down moral laws for humanity.
    • 2. Identify the sources of the ethical teachings and central beliefs of Judaism (the Hebrew Bible, the Commentaries): belief in God, observance of law, practice of the concepts of righteousness and justice, and importance of study: and describe how the ideas of the Hebrew traditions are reflected in the moral and ethical traditions of Western civilization.
    • 3. Explain the significance of Abraham, Moses, Naomi, Ruth, David, and Yohanan ben Zaccai in the development of the Jewish religion.
    • 4. Discuss the locations of the settlements and movements of Hebrew peoples, including the Exodus and their movement to and from Egypt, and outline the significance of the Exodus to the Jewish and other people.
    6.4 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of Ancient Greece.
    • 4. Explain the significance of Greek mythology to the everyday life of people in the region and how Greek literature continues to permeate our literature and language today, drawing from Greek mythology and epics, such as Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, and from Aesop’s Fables.
    6.5 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of India.
    • 3. Explain the major beliefs and practices of Brahmanism in India and how they evolved into early Hinduism.
    • 5. Know the life and moral teachings of Buddha and how Buddhism spread in India, Ceylon, and Central Asia.
    6.6 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of China.
    • 3. Know about the life of Confucius and the fundamental teachings of Confucianism and Taoism.
    • 8. Describe the diffusion of Buddhism northward to China during the Han Dynasty.
    6.7 Students analyze the geographic, political economic, religious, and social structures during the development of Rome.
    • 5. Trace the migration of Jews around the Mediterranean region and the effects of their conflict with the Romans, including the Romans’ restrictions on their right to live in Jerusalem.
    • 6. Note the origins of Christianity in the Jewish Messianic prophecies, the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as described in the New Testament, and the contribution of St. Paul the Apostle to the definition and spread of Christian beliefs (e.g., belief in the Trinity, resurrection, salvation).
    • 7. Describe the circumstances that led to the spread of Christianity in Europe and other Roman territories.

    7th Grade: History/Social Science

    World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times

    7.1 Students analyze the causes and effects of the vast expansion and ultimate disintegration of the Roman Empire.
    • 3. Describe the establishment by Constantine of the new capital in Constantinople and the development of the Byzantine Empire, with an emphasis on the consequences of the development of two distinct European civilizations, Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic, and their two distinct views on church-state relations.
    7.2 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Islam in the Middle Ages.
    • 2. Trace the origins of Islam and the life and teachings of Muhammad, including Islamic teachings on the connection with Judaism and Christianity.
    • 3. Explain the significance of the Qur’an and the Sunnah as the primary sources of Islamic beliefs, practice, and law, and their influence in Muslim’s daily life.
    7.3 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of China in the Middle Ages.
    • 1. Describe the reunification of China under the Tang Dynasty and reasons for the spread of Buddhism in Tang China, Korea, and Japan.
    7.4 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the sub-Saharan civilizations of Ghana and Mali in Medieval Africa.
    • 3. Describe the role of the trans-Saharan caravan trade in the changing religious and cultural characteristics of West Africa and the influence of Islamic beliefs, ethics, and law.
    • 4. Trace the growth of the Arabic language in government, trade, and Islamic scholarship in West Africa.
    7.6 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Medieval Europe.
    • 6. Discuss the causes and course of the religious Crusades and their effects on the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish populations in Europe, with emphasis on the increasing contact by Europeans with cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean world.
    7.7 Students compare and contrast the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the Meso-American and Andean civilizations.
    • 1. Study the locations, landforms, and climates of Mexico, Central America, and South America and their effects on Mayan, Aztec, and Incan economies, trade, and development of urban societies.
    • 2. Study the roles of people in each society, including class structure, family life, warfare, religious beliefs and practices, and slavery.
    • 4. Describe the artistic and oral traditions and architecture in the three civilizations.
    • 5. Describe the Meso-American achievements in astronomy and mathematics, including the development of the calendar and the Meso-American knowledge of seasonal changes to the civilizations’ agricultural systems.
    7.8 Students analyze the origins, accomplishments, and geographic diffusion of the Renaissance.
    • 4. Describe the growth and effects of new ways of disseminating information (e.g., the ability to manufacture paper, translation of the Bible into vernacular, printing).
    • 5. Detail advances made in literature, the arts, science, mathematics, cartography, engineering, and the understanding of human anatomy and astronomy (e.g., Dante Alighieri, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo di Buonarroti Simoni, Johann Gutenberg, William Shakespeare).
    7.9 Students analyze the historical developments of the Reformation.
    • 3. Explain Protestants’ new practices of church self-government and the influence of those practices on the development of democratic practices and ideas of federalism.
    • 7. Describe the Golden Age of cooperation between Jews and Muslims in medieval Spain that promoted creativity in art, literature, and science, including how that cooperation was terminated by the religious persecution of individuals and groups (e.g., the Spanish Inquisition and the expulsion of Jews and Muslims from Spain in 1492).
    7.11 Students analyze political and economic change in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries (the Age of Exploration, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Reason).
    • 2. Discuss the exchanges of plants, animals, technology, culture, and ideas among Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and the major economic and social effects on each continent.

    8th Grade: History/Social Science

    United States History and Geography: Growth and Conflict

    8.2 Students analyze the political principles underlying the U.S. Constitution and compare the enumerated and implied powers of the federal government.
    • 5. Understand the significance of Jefferson’s Statute for Religious Freedom as a forerunner of the First Amendment and the origins, purpose, and differing views of the founding fathers on the issue of the separation of church and state.
    8.6 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced, with emphasis on the Northeast.
    • 3. List the reasons for the wave of immigration from Northern Europe to the United States and describe the growth in the number, size, and spatial arrangements of cities (e.g., Irish immigrants and the Great Irish Famine).
    • 5. Trace the development of the American education system from its earliest roots, including the roles of religious and private schools and Horace Mann’s campaign for free public education and its assimilating role in American culture.
    8.12 Students analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in the United States in response to the Industrial Revolution.
    • 2. Identify the reasons for the development of federal Indian policy and the wars with American Indians and their relationship to agricultural development and industrialization.
    • 5. Examine the location and effects of urbanization, renewed immigration, and industrialization (e.g., the effects on social fabric of cities, wealth and economic opportunity, the conservation movement).
    • 7. Identify the new sources of large-scale immigration and the contributions of immigrants to the building of cities and the economy: explain the ways in which new social and economic patterns encourage assimilation of newcomers into the mainstream amidst growing cultural diversity: and discuss the new wave of nativism.

    From http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/
    Click to download as a PDF.

  • 6th Grade: History/Social Science

    World History and Geography: Ancient Civilizations

    6.3 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the Ancient Hebrews.
    • 2. Identify the sources of the ethical teachings and central beliefs of Judaism (the Hebrew Bible, the Commentaries): belief in God, observance of law, practice of the concepts of righteousness and justice, and importance of study: and describe how the ideas of the Hebrew traditions are reflected in the moral and ethical traditions of Western civilization.
    6.6 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the early civilizations of China.
    • 7. Cite the significance of the trans-Eurasian “silk roads” in the period of the Han Dynasty and Roman Empire and their locations.

    7th Grade: History/Social Science

    World History and Geography: Medieval and Early Modern Times

    7.2 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Islam in the Middle Ages.
    • 3. Explain the significance of the Qur’an and the Sunnah as the primary sources of Islamic beliefs, practice, and law, and their influence in Muslim’s daily life.
    7.5 Students analyze the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the civilizations of Medieval Japan.
    • 1. Describe the significance of Japan’s proximity to China and Korea and the intellectual, linguistic, religious, and philosophical influence of those countries on Japan.
    • 3. Describe the values, social customs, and traditions prescribed by the lord-vassal system consisting of shogun, daimyo, and samurai and the lasting influence of the warrior code in the twentieth century.
    7.7 Students compare and contrast the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of the Meso-American and Andean civilizations.
    • 4. Describe the artistic and oral traditions and architecture in the three civilizations.
    7.11 Students analyze political and economic change in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries (the Age of Exploration, the Enlightenment, and the Age of Reason).
    • 2. Discuss the exchanges of plants, animals, technology, culture, and ideas among Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and the major economic and social effects on each continent.

    8th Grade: History/Social Science

    United States History and Geography: Growth and Conflict

    8.4 Students analyze the aspirations and ideals of the people of the new nation.
    • 4. Discuss daily life, including traditions in art, music, and literature, of early national America (e.g., through writings by Washington Irving, James Fenimore Cooper).
    8.6 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced, with emphasis on the Northeast.
    • 3. List the reasons for the wave of immigration from Northern Europe to the United States and describe the growth in the number, size, and spatial arrangements of cities (e.g., Irish immigrants and the Great Irish Famine).
    • 5. Trace the development of the American education system from its earliest roots, including the roles of religious and private schools and Horace Mann’s campaign for free public education and its assimilating role in American culture.
    8.12 Students analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in the United States in response to the Industrial Revolution.
    • 2. Identify the reasons for the development of federal Indian policy and the wars with American Indians and their relationship to agricultural development and industrialization.
    • 5. Examine the location and effects of urbanization, renewed immigration, and industrialization (e.g., the effects on social fabric of cities, wealth and economic opportunity, the conservation movement).
    • 7. Identify the new sources of large-scale immigration and the contributions of immigrants to the building of cities and the economy: explain the ways in which new social and economic patterns encourage assimilation of newcomers into the mainstream amidst growing cultural diversity: and discuss the new wave of nativism.

    From http://www.cde.ca.gov/be/st/ss/
    Click to download as a PDF.